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New City Plan to guide Brisbane's future development

31 January, 2014

New City Plan to guide Brisbane’s future development

The draft new City Plan to protect Brisbane’s way of life and guide future residential development is expected to be endorsed by a special meeting of Brisbane City Council next week.

Lord Mayor Graham Quirk said Council had considered feedback from more than 2700 submissions on the draft plan that was initially released in November 2012 and followed a doubling of the statutory community consultation period during 2013.

Cr Quirk said under the draft plan, less than 7 per cent of Brisbane would experience significant change over the next 20 years, and major residential growth would be focused around key transport corridors.

“Brisbane is at the centre of one of the fastest growing regions in Australia and this plan is about balancing the effects of our increasing population with our enviable way of life,” Cr Quirk said.

“Under the draft new City Plan, growth will be focused around major shopping centres and along selected transport corridors while maintaining the leafy suburban character of Brisbane's suburban living areas.

“Through the draft new City Plan we are ensuring Brisbane is prepared for a jobs and population increase and has the infrastructure to support and create a more diversified economy.”

Cr Quirk said the past two decades of growth had transformed Brisbane from a regional centre into a global hub, and with the economy and population set to grow to 2031 and beyond, a new plan was needed to balance the effects of this growth with community needs.

“The post Expo 88 period has been very good for Brisbane and with the draft new City Plan and our proactive planning for the future, we can ensure that the next 20 years are even better.”

“Brisbane is now at the centre of the fastest growing region in Australia with a thriving economy driving growth across the city.

“We have spent the last six months reviewing more than 2700 submissions and taken on board those suggestions and made some amendments, such as removing the requirement for a neighbour’s consent to build a built to boundary wall in the small lot code.

“Council has retained the allowable size of a secondary dwelling or granny flat at 80 square metres, without the need for a development application, to enable increased housing options and ensure family members have the option to age in place.

“The revised plan also details changes to car parking rates and requirements by lowering these slightly in some instances, in response to further evidence about reduced car ownership in some specific circumstances such as residents of student and short-term accommodation or retirement villages.”

Council has revised parking rates for multiple dwellings, allowing for reduced on-site parking for units located in the city frame or near public transport, as part of ensuring Council can boost housing options in areas well located near services and frequent public transport.

Cr Quirk said a number of features of the draft plan had been retained, such as keeping the maximum building height for a house, without the need for a development application, at 9.5 metres. These homes must still only be two storeys.

“This will allow for improved flood immunity and more flexibility to accommodate climate sensitive house designs,” he said.

“It will also ensure we continue cutting red tape by removing the need for unnecessary development applications and reducing building costs.

Cr Quirk said by 2031 Brisbane would have 443,000 new metropolitan jobs and 7.8 million square metres of additional commercial, industrial and retail space as our lifestyle draws investors, entrepreneurs, and companies here for business.

“We need to harness economic opportunity to ensure a bright future for generations to come with strategic planning needed to prepare for this economic growth.”

Cr Quirk said Council had also revised the industry zone names and reduced levels of assessment and the requirements for specialist reports for industrial development.

“These changes will encourage housing options and investment across the city, which is vital as part of our responsibility to support South East Queensland’s population growth and Brisbane’s economic development,” he said.

“By 2031, 4.6 million people will live in South East Queensland and 1.27 million will call Brisbane home, so this plan is about having the necessary provisions in place to support this growth.

“On top of residential growth we will also cater for the forecasted 443,000 jobs in the metropolitan area by 2031.”

In response to feedback, a range of other new enhancements are being added to the interactive mapping including contours, Priority Infrastructure Plan maps and 1946 aerial photography.

Council’s interactive mapping will make it easier for potential investors and residents to look at a site and have access to information about potential planning issues. The interactive mapping provides searchable site by site information on a range of planning matters such as flooding, significant landscape trees and heritage.

The draft new City Plan revisions follow the largest city-wide consultation program for Brisbane in more than a decade.

At the conclusion of debate, Council will approve a revised draft plan and send the draft plan back to the State Government for final approval to proceed. This approval may take up to several months before Council can set a commencement date.
FACT SHEET - Key changes to the draft new City Plan

 Parking Ratios: Council has reduced visitor parking for multiple dwellings. Council has maintained or increased the resident parking rates for two-bedroom and three-bedroom units, and decreased resident parking rates for 1 bedroom units in areas within 400m walking distance of a transport interchange. This will boost housing options in areas well located near services and frequent public transport.
 Small lots: The requirements for small lots of 300 square metres has been revised in the low density residential zone, with sites now having to be within 200 metres from a centre zone that is larger than 2000 square metres. This will boost housing options in appropriate suburban areas.
 Granny flats: The allowable size of a secondary dwelling (or granny flat) at 80 square metres, without the need for a development assessment, has been retained.
 Development Centres: Centre and mixed use zones are areas in the city that accommodate the largest and most diverse mix of uses. The key revisions provide for more practical hours of operation and deliveries in all centre zones to allow more flexibility for businesses.
 Industry zone names: Council has revised the industry zone names and reduced levels of assessment and the requirements for specialist reports for industrial development. This will encourage investment across the city, which is vital as part of Council’s responsibility to support South East Queensland’s population growth and promote Brisbane’s economic development.
 Side setback requirements: The Dwelling house (small lot) code has been revised to remove the requirements for a neighbour’s consent to build a built to boundary wall. In its place the plan now specifies new side setback requirements to allow for flexibility of building design while protecting adjoining neighbour’s interests.
 Protection of pre-1911 buildings: These buildings within high and medium density residential, industrial and centre zones now have the option of relocating the building to a site legally secured within the Traditional building character overlay where the building is not practical to maintain on the current site.
 Building Heights: The maximum building height for a house that does not require a development application is 9.5 metres. This will allow for improved flood immunity and more flexibility to accommodate climate sensitive house designs. Council has however revised the Dwelling house (small lot) codes to clarify that houses in the Low density residential and Character residential zones must still only be two storeys.



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